Country Pate


Charcuterie is far more than just making sausage. My first attempt at anything like charcuterie was chopped chicken liver made with a friend back in the early 60s when I was still in high school. It worked.

Some years later, in the early 80s I made another attempt at this craft. This time a Country Pate. My wife and I were so lacking in knowledge of this that we tried to eat it the day I made it and were terribly disappointed. At the suggestion of a more sophisticated couple she knew we attempted the pate again after it had sat for two days. Thank you Larry and Leo, without your advice that day I'm certain I would not have attempted it again.

I make this pate yearly, if not more often, as we like it. I made two on the Sunday past which I will document here. I will also be making one to take with me to the Cleveland meeting of the America's Test Kitchen Irregulars, where I will demonstrate making a fourth.

I've blogged here on this before, here, but this time I will be including the recipe.

This is the finished product, but before going in the oven.



First we need to gather our ingrediants.




This does use a fair bit. Even allowing for the fact I'm doing two pates, each contains 7 pounds of meat, most of it pork. Cheap pork, that butt was on sale for $0.79/lb and I had 3 pounds plus the bone left over for something else.




Now I should mention that this pate is an unofficial entry in to an offal contest. (Hunter Angler Gardner Cook) Now it isn't that I don't approve of an offal contest, and with two different ones in the pate it should qualify, but I'm not really entering. I was hoping to do this with smoked sweetbreads rather than smoked chicken liver, but I couldn't find them.

The prize is a copy of the old Time Life The Good Cook Variety Meats cook book, and I still have my copy, along with every volume in that series and the TL Foods of the World series. Books well worth having if you can find them. Why Time Life doesn't at least put out a CD reprint is beyond me. I'll buy it.


The ingrediants:


2 lb boneless fatty pork, (I take it off a fresh butt or shoulder or foreleg. I suppose you could use fresh ham.)


1 lb boneless veal,  (I trim leanish meat off a veal breast)


1 lb pork liver
1 lb chicken livers


31/2 cups  breadcrumbs


1 large onion, finely chopped and sautéed in  until soft in
2 tbsp butter
3 garlic cloves, crushed to a paste with


½ tsp salt
2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley


2 tsp mixed spices (paprika, cayenne, mustard, fresh ground pepper, whatever)


1 tbsp mixed dry herbs (fresh is better if you can get them. Tarragon, rosemary, chive, thyme, whatever)


1 tbsp salt


6 eggs


½ cup cognac
3 lbs thin/medium cut bacon, should be mild if smoked, Costco is fine.
5 small but whole bayleaves

If you don't have a meat grinder then the fatty pork, veal and pork liver will need to be ground, I wouldn't use a food processor for this.

That is all of the meat but the bacon. Note that because I've a smoker going for another project, which will be posted soon, the chicken livers are smoked for this pate only.




Cube the meats, except the chicken livers, and set aside.




OK that is ready for the grinder, go stick it in a freezer or at least the fridge. We don't need to keep this as cold as for sausage, but it does have to stay cold.



Above is the very large chopped onion and the other fresh herbs. And what is left of the butter after 2 tablespoons went in a skillet.




And the bread crumbs, plain old bread crumbs out of a can from the store. I could make my own, but I usually don't have that much home baked bread to waste.

Get you terrine and your bacon, that 2 lbs will turn out to be a few strips short.




Then start a basket weave with the bacon




You get the idea.




Grind away. That is the KA grinder and I used the large die. Note that the entire grinder was held in an ice bath prior to use, and the blade was steeled prior to assembly of the grinder.




And the meat is ground.




The eggs and cognac, everthing except the ground meat and smoked liver.




Now this is the other pate, but you can see the chicken livers, fresh in this case, on top of the half filled terrine, 3 qt terrine works fine.




And here is it finished. Bay leaves in place, basket weave closed ready for a 350 F oven for 90 minutes.
Then I will check the center for 130F and when it gets there let it finish cooking out of the oven.



A finished product. This will sit in the fridge until Saturday when it will be part of my wife's and my contribution to the food for the reception for Ron Knoll's memorial on May 3.





 

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Page: 1 of 2
  • 4/29/2008 2:29 PM noble pig wrote:
    Wow, this is a labor of love. It's beautiful, thanks for sharing your talent!
    Reply to this
    1. 7/13/2010 2:58 PM Tech Blog wrote:
      Your stuff made my mouth watered i am just going to kitchen hehehehe
      Reply to this
  • 4/30/2008 8:49 AM charcuteire wrote:
    It isn't that hard nor expensive and making food for another group gives me a chance to do this pate more than once this year.

    The pate does freeze quite well after cooking, and also makes an excellent stuffing for pork chops.
    Reply to this
  • 4/30/2008 12:21 PM Andrew wrote:
    That is one seriously good looking pate. I got the terrine itch, especially with summer on the horizon.
    Reply to this
  • 5/4/2008 2:58 PM Charcuteire wrote:
    That pate, it's smoked twin and 7.5 pounds of cured salmon were quite popular Saturday at the memorial. Besides the about 200 people who RSVPed, we had about 60 who just wandered in. To give you an idea of how we felt about Ron, I know of two people who flew in from the West Coast for this and a third who would have if she could have gotten the time off.
    Reply to this
  • 5/4/2008 3:09 PM Tammy wrote:
    Wow, that's inspiring. Love the bacon weave!
    Reply to this
    1. 11/26/2010 8:16 PM quebec incorporation wrote:
      well, it is delicious. I have never seen ones like that. It is happy to prepare these ones for my family. Thanks
      Reply to this
      1. 12/22/2010 10:49 AM Austin lawyers wrote:
        I am very glad with your recipes. Looking too yummy I can surprise my wife this weekend with this cook.
        Reply to this
  • 5/5/2008 3:08 PM Pixie wrote:
    Hi,

    Such a creative dish! Thanks for stopping by, in regards to our putting up event, yes, we are looking for canned goods and preserves. I'm amazed with all those jars on your shelf- wonderful. Looking forward to your entry as I'm sure you have a lot to offer to the event.

    Thanks

    Pixie
    Reply to this
    1. 6/30/2010 3:55 AM WoW Game Card wrote:
      This is easier and surely gives comfort to internet users. Thanks for sharing. Post like this offers great benefit. Thank you!
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  • 5/5/2008 5:04 PM ulla wrote:
    Goodness that is a thing of art!
    Reply to this
  • 5/6/2008 9:22 AM charcuteire wrote:
    The recipe I derived that from had the terrine line in caul fat and the top in fat back. Not being able to get either, I used bacon. The basket was just to make it look better than strips runing from one side to the other.

    BTW Jane Grigson in her 1967 book, Charcuterie - French Pork Cooking (title may be a little off) says that the idea way to store pate is can it.

    Think I will pass on that, I'm already getting strange looks from the wife.
    Reply to this
    1. 6/27/2010 2:28 PM weight loss pills wrote:
      Such a creative dish! Thanks for stopping by, in regards to our putting up event, yes, we are looking for canned goods and preserves. I'm amazed with all those jars on your shelf- wonderful. Looking forward to your entry as I'm sure you have a lot to offer to the event.
      Reply to this
  • 7/8/2008 4:07 PM Cheryl wrote:
    I see you did, in fact, smoke the chicken livers, hence the handiness of a perforated grill pan. I definitely get it now. You're really dedicated to this charcuterie thing! Looks meaty.
    Reply to this
    1. 8/8/2010 11:40 PM WoW Accounts wrote:
      Really enjoy what you guys are always up too. Such clever work and reporting! Keep up the great works and I will visit your blog regularly for some latest post.
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    2. 9/4/2010 12:06 PM Sell Phones for Cash wrote:
      I love your pate and the details of your recipe. Am wondering where you got the Pork Liver from? I cannot seem to find any here in San Diego. Am using chicken livers. Any advise plse? I'd appreciate your time to answer my mail. Thanks.
      Reply to this
      1. 9/6/2010 5:44 PM Hochzeitsfotograf Starnberg wrote:
        Such a creative dish! Thanks for stopping by, in regards to our putting up event, yes, we are looking for canned goods and preserves. I'm amazed with all those jars on your shelf- wonderful. Looking forward to your entry as I'm sure you have a lot to offer to the event.
        Reply to this
  • 12/11/2009 3:39 PM JP Weber wrote:
    I love your pate and the details of your recipe. Am wondering where you got the Pork Liver from? I cannot seem to find any here in San Diego. Am using chicken livers. Any advise plse? I'd appreciate your time to answer my mail. Thanks. JP
    Reply to this
    1. 9/4/2010 12:11 PM Warner aka ntsc wrote:
      I don't know when you made this comment, but it appears in my controls today 9/4/10.

      I find pork liver as a common item at the supermarket, chicken livers will do, so will calves, but pork is better. As the supermarket butcher, he may be able to help.
      Reply to this
  • 1/8/2010 11:50 AM online tv wrote:
    Such a creative dish! Thanks for stopping by, in regards to our putting up event, yes, we are looking for canned goods and preserves. I'm amazed with all those jars on your shelf- wonderful. Looking forward to your entry as I'm sure you have a lot to offer to the event.
    Reply to this
  • 4/23/2010 4:24 AM web hosting wrote:
    Look at that cat sitting all quiet there. Mine would never be able to just sit if I had so much meat on the table.
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    One dish I prepare often is Lapin (rabbit) Ali Bab, adapted from my friend Ron Cook and from Lydie, who adapted it from Ron. The first time I made it I was cat-sitting alone in Lydie’s château before I moved here. A friend of hers – also a cooking teacher and the mother of a prominent New York chef – was arriving for a few days, so I knew her welcoming dinner had to be special. I bought the rabbit at the hypermarché, where it is less expensive, cut up and pre-packaged, rather than whole, elongated, and eviscerated with its organs hanging out in the customary French presentation.
    Reply to this
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